10 Famous Poems by Victor Hugo

Jumat

10 Famous Poems by Victor Hugo

Victor Hugo and His Famous Poems - The novelist, poet, and dramatist Victor Marie Hugo was born in Besançon, France, Feb. 26, 1802 and  died May 22, 1885, was the preeminent French man of letters of the 19th century and the leading exponent and champion of romanticism. Victor Hugo is a writer whose works are discussed more often than they are actually read. Perhaps we had Les Misérables force-fed to us in high school or saw one of the many film versions of his novel The Hunchback of Notre Dame. But of his many other works of prose, poetry, and drama, most modern readers are ignorant -- as they are of the details of Hugo's life. In Victor Hugo, Graham Robb brings a fresh eye to an old subject with laudable results.

During his lifetime, Hugo himself was the author of most of the legend that has grown up around him, from his pastoral conception on a mountainside to his heroic republican opposition to Napoleon. Robb turns these myths inside out as he searches for the underlying compulsions that led Hugo to obsessively recreate his own history. Robb thoroughly and compassionately presents the tangled, sometimes sordid, often ridiculous events of Hugo's life, at the same time commenting knowledgeably on his work. Victor Hugo is a terrific biography of a fascinating man, a great motivator for readers to start agitating for more translations of Hugo's work.



Here's 10 poems by Hugo that you can read.


The Genesis Of The Butterfly

The dawn is smiling on the dew that covers
The tearful roses; lo, the little lovers
That kiss the buds, and all the flutterings
In jasmine bloom, and privet, of white wings,
That go and come, and fly, and peep and hide,
With muffled music, murmured far and wide.
Ah, the Spring time, when we think of all the lays
That dreamy lovers send to dreamy mays,
Of the fond hearts within a billet bound,
Of all the soft silk paper that pens wound,
The messages of love that mortals write
Filled with intoxication of delight,
Written in April and before the May time
Shredded and flown, playthings for the wind's playtime,
We dream that all white butterflies above,
Who seek through clouds or waters souls to love,
And leave their lady mistress in despair,
To flit to flowers, as kinder and more fair,
Are but torn love-letters, that through the skies
Flutter, and float, and change to butterflies



Letter

You can see it already: chalks and ochers;
Country crossed with a thousand furrow-lines;
Ground-level rooftops hidden by the shrubbery;
Sporadic haystacks standing on the grass;
Smoky old rooftops tarnishing the landscape;
A river (not Cayster or Ganges, though:
A feeble Norman salt-infested watercourse);
On the right, to the north, bizarre terrain
ll angular--you'd think a shovel did it.
So that's the foreground. An old chapel adds
Its antique spire, and gathers alongside it
A few gnarled elms with grumpy silhouettes;
Seemingly tired of all the frisky breezes,
They carp at every gust that stirs them up.
At one side of my house a big wheelbarrow
Is rusting; and before me lies the vast
Horizon, all its notches filled with ocean blue;
Cocks and hens spread their gildings, and converse
Beneath my window; and the rooftop attics,
Now and then, toss me songs in dialect.
In my lane dwells a patriarchal rope-maker;
The old man makes his wheel run loud, and goes
Retrograde, hemp wreathed tightly round the midriff.
I like these waters where the wild gale scuds;
All day the country tempts me to go strolling;
The little village urchins, book in hand,
Envy me, at the schoolmaster's (my lodging),
As a big schoolboy sneaking a day off.
The air is pure, the sky smiles; there's a constant
Soft noise of children spelling things aloud.
The waters flow; a linnet flies; and I say: "Thank you!
Thank you, Almighty God!"--So, then, I live:
Peacefully, hour by hour, with little fuss, I shed
My days, and think of you, my lady fair!
I hear the children chattering; and I see, at times,
Sailing across the high seas in its pride,
Over the gables of the tranquil village,
Some winged ship which is traveling far away,
Flying across the ocean, hounded by all the winds.
Lately it slept in port beside the quay.
Nothing has kept it from the jealous sea-surge:
No tears of relatives, nor fears of wives,
Nor reefs dimly reflected in the waters,
Nor importunity of sinister birds.



The Grave And The Rose

The Grave said to the Rose,
"What of the dews of dawn,
Love's flower, what end is theirs?"
"And what of spirits flown,
The souls whereon doth close
The tomb's mouth unawares?"
The Rose said to the Grave.

The Rose said, "In the shade
From the dawn's tears is made
A perfume faint and strange,
Amber and honey sweet."
"And all the spirits fleet
Do suffer a sky-change,
More strangely than the dew,
To God's own angels new,"
The Grave said to the Rose.



The Portrait of A Child

That brow, that smile, that cheek so fair,
Beseem my child, who weeps and plays:
A heavenly spirit guards her ways,
From whom she stole that mixture rare.
Through all her features shining mild,
The poet sees an angel there,
The father sees a child.

And by their flame so pure and bright,
We see how lately those sweet eyes
Have wandered down from Paradise,
And still are lingering in its light.

All earthly things are but a shade
Through which she looks at things above,
And sees the holy Mother-maid,
Athwart her mother's glance of love.

She seems celestial songs to hear,
And virgin souls are whispering near.
Till by her radiant smile deceived,
I say, 'Young angel, lately given,
When was thy martyrdom achieved?
And what name lost thou bear in heaven?'



The Veil

THE SISTER

Why, brother, why upon me stare?
Why do your brows so fiercely lower?
Your eyes like funeral torches glare,
Beneath their gloomy looks I cower.
Why do I see your sashes rent?
Why have you thrice your fingers laid
Upon the sheath? What dire intent
Makes you half draw the glittering blade?


FIRST BROTHER 

Raised you today your veil, and face displayed!


SISTER 

Home from the bath my path I took—
Brothers! Look not so terribly!—
And I was hidden from the look
Of every unbeliever's eye.
But as the Mosque I hurried by,
Close covered in my palanquin,
Stifled beneath the mid-day sky,
I loosed my veil to breathe between.


SECOND BROTHER 

Did not a man then pass in Cafton green?


SISTER 

Ah, yes, perhaps it may be so;
But he ne'er saw my face. My brothers,
Together you are whispering low—
What whisper you to one another?
You would not kill me? On your soul
He saw me not! My oath believe!
Have mercy! Your blind rage control!
Your poor young sister, O reprieve!

THIRD BROTHER

Blood-red I saw the sun sink down at eve.


SISTER 

Mercy, O mercy! Brothers, cease,
Your daggers stab me to the heart!
Brothers! I cling about your knees!
O veil! White veil! The cause thou art!
Brothers! Your dying sister prop,
Tear not my bleeding hand away—
Darkness come o'er me—with me stop—
The veil of death shuts out the day.

FOURTH BROTHER

Unlifted by your hands this veil will stay.



A Petite Jeanne

Vous eûtes donc hier un an, ma bien-aimée.
Contente, vous jasez, comme, sous la ramée,
Au fond du nid plus tiède ouvrant de vagues yeux,
Les oiseaux nouveau-nés gazouillent, tout joyeux
De sentir qu'il commence à leur pousser des plumes.
Jeanne, ta bouche est rose ; et dans les gros volumes
Dont les images font ta joie, et que je dois,
Pour te plaire, laisser chiffonner par tes doigts,
On trouve de beaux vers ; mais pas un qui te vaille
Quand tout ton petit corps en me voyant tressaille ;
Les plus fameux auteurs n'ont rien écrit de mieux
Que la pensée éclose à demi dans tes yeux,
Et que ta rêverie obscure, éparse, étrange,
Regardant l'homme avec l'ignorance de l'ange.
Jeanne, Dieu n'est pas loin puisque vous êtes là.

Ah ! vous avez un an, c'est un âge cela !
Vous êtes par moments grave, quoique ravie ;
Vous êtes à l'instant céleste de la vie
Où l'homme n'a pas d'ombre, où dans ses bras ouverts,
Quand il tient ses parents, l'enfant tient l'univers ;
Votre jeune âme vit, songe, rit, pleure, espère
D'Alice votre mère à Charles votre père ;
Tout l'horizon que peut contenir votre esprit
Va d'elle qui vous berce à lui qui vous sourit ;
Ces deux êtres pour vous à cette heure première
Sont toute la caresse et toute la lumière ;
Eux deux, eux seuls, ô Jeanne ; et c'est juste ; et je suis,
Et j'existe, humble aïeul, parce que je vous suis ;
Et vous venez, et moi je m'en vais ; et j'adore,
N'ayant droit qu'à la nuit, votre droit à l'aurore.
Votre blond frère George et vous, vous suffisez
A mon âme, et je vois vos jeux, et c'est assez ;
Et je ne veux, après mes épreuves sans nombre,
Qu'un tombeau sur lequel se découpera l'ombre
De vos berceaux dorés par le soleil levant.

Ah ! nouvelle venue innocente, et rêvant,
Vous avez pris pour naître une heure singulière ;
Vous êtes, Jeanne, avec les terreurs familière ;
Vous souriez devant tout un monde aux abois ;
Vous faites votre bruit d'abeille dans les bois,
Ô Jeanne, et vous mêlez votre charmant murmure
Au grand Paris faisant sonner sa grande armure.
Ah ! quand je vous entends, Jeanne, et quand je vous vois
Chanter, et, me parlant avec votre humble voix,
Tendre vos douces mains au-dessus de nos têtes,
Il me semble que l'ombre où grondent les tempêtes
Tremble et s'éloigne avec des rugissements sourds,
Et que Dieu fait donner à la ville aux cent tours
Désemparée ainsi qu'un navire qui sombre,
Aux énormes canons gardant le rempart sombre,
A l'univers qui penche et que Paris défend,
Sa bénédiction par un petit enfant.



Enthousiasme 

Enthousiasme
En Grèce ! en Grèce ! adieu, vous tous ! il faut partir !
Qu'enfin, après le sang de ce peuple martyr,
Le sang vil des bourreaux ruisselle !
En Grèce, à mes amis ! vengeance ! liberté !
Ce turban sur mon front ! ce sabre à mon côté !
Allons ! ce cheval, qu'on le selle !

Quand partons-nous ? Ce soir ! demain serait trop long.
Des armes ! des chevaux ! un navire à Toulon !
Un navire, ou plutôt des ailes !
Menons quelques débris de nos vieux régiments,
Et nous verrons soudain ces tigres ottomans
Fuir avec des pieds de gazelles !

Commande-nous, Fabvier, comme un prince invoqué !
Toi qui seul fus au poste où les rois ont manqué,
Chef des hordes disciplinées,
Parmi les grecs nouveaux ombre d'un vieux romain,
Simple et brave soldat, qui dans ta rude main
D'un peuple as pris les destinées !

De votre long sommeil éveillez-vous là-bas,
Fusils français ! et vous, musique des combats,
Bombes, canons, grêles cymbales !
Eveillez-vous, chevaux au pied retentissant,
Sabres, auxquels il manque une trempe de sang,
Longs pistolets gorgés de balles !

Je veux voir des combats, toujours au premier rang !
Voir comment les spahis s'épanchent en torrent
Sur l'infanterie inquiète ;
Voir comment leur damas, qu'emporte leur coursier,
Coupe une tête au fil de son croissant d'acier !
Allons !... - mais quoi, pauvre poète,

Où m'emporte moi-même un accès belliqueux ?
Les vieillards, les enfants m'admettent avec eux.
Que suis-je ? - Esprit qu'un souffle enlève.
Comme une feuille morte, échappée aux bouleaux,
Qui sur une onde en pente erre de flots en flots,
Mes jours s'en vont de rêve en rêve.

Tout me fait songer : l'air, les prés, les monts, les bois.
J'en ai pour tout un jour des soupirs d'un hautbois,
D'un bruit de feuilles remuées ;
Quand vient le crépuscule, au fond d'un vallon noir,
J'aime un grand lac d'argent, profond et clair miroir
Où se regardent les nuées.

J'aime une lune, ardente et rouge comme l'or,
Se levant dans la brume épaisse, ou bien encor
Blanche au bord d'un nuage sombre ;
J'aime ces chariots lourds et noirs, qui la nuit,
Passant devant le seuil des fermes avec bruit,
Font aboyer les chiens dans l'ombre.

En Grèce ! en Grèce ! adieu, vous tous ! il faut partir !
Qu'enfin, après le sang de ce peuple martyr,
Le sang vil des bourreaux ruisselle !
En Grèce, à mes amis ! vengeance ! liberté !
Ce turban sur mon front ! ce sabre à mon côté !
Allons ! ce cheval, qu'on le selle !

Quand partons-nous ? Ce soir ! demain serait trop long.
Des armes ! des chevaux ! un navire à Toulon !
Un navire, ou plutôt des ailes !
Menons quelques débris de nos vieux régiments,
Et nous verrons soudain ces tigres ottomans
Fuir avec des pieds de gazelles !

Commande-nous, Fabvier, comme un prince invoqué !
Toi qui seul fus au poste où les rois ont manqué,
Chef des hordes disciplinées,
Parmi les grecs nouveaux ombre d'un vieux romain,
Simple et brave soldat, qui dans ta rude main
D'un peuple as pris les destinées !

De votre long sommeil éveillez-vous là-bas,
Fusils français ! et vous, musique des combats,
Bombes, canons, grêles cymbales !
Eveillez-vous, chevaux au pied retentissant,
Sabres, auxquels il manque une trempe de sang,
Longs pistolets gorgés de balles !

Je veux voir des combats, toujours au premier rang !
Voir comment les spahis s'épanchent en torrent
Sur l'infanterie inquiète ;
Voir comment leur damas, qu'emporte leur coursier,
Coupe une tête au fil de son croissant d'acier !
Allons !... - mais quoi, pauvre poète,

Où m'emporte moi-même un accès belliqueux ?
Les vieillards, les enfants m'admettent avec eux.
Que suis-je ? - Esprit qu'un souffle enlève.
Comme une feuille morte, échappée aux bouleaux,
Qui sur une onde en pente erre de flots en flots,
Mes jours s'en vont de rêve en rêve.

Tout me fait songer : l'air, les prés, les monts, les bois.
J'en ai pour tout un jour des soupirs d'un hautbois,
D'un bruit de feuilles remuées ;
Quand vient le crépuscule, au fond d'un vallon noir,
J'aime un grand lac d'argent, profond et clair miroir
Où se regardent les nuées.

J'aime une lune, ardente et rouge comme l'or,
Se levant dans la brume épaisse, ou bien encor
Blanche au bord d'un nuage sombre ;
J'aime ces chariots lourds et noirs, qui la nuit,
Passant devant le seuil des fermes avec bruit,
Font aboyer les chiens dans l'ombre.



Danger D'Aller Dans Les Bois

Ne te figure pas, ma belle,
Que les bois soient pleins d'innocents.
La feuille s'émeut comme l'aile
Dans les noirs taillis frémissants ;

L'innocence que tu supposes
Aux chers petits oiseaux bénis
N'empêche pas les douces choses
Que Dieu veut et que font les nids.

Les imiter serait mon rêve ;
Je baise en songe ton bras blanc ;
Commence ! dit l'Aurore. - Achève !
Dit l'étoile. Et je suis tremblant.

Toutes les mauvaises pensées,
Les oiseaux les ont, je les ai,
Et par les forêts insensées
Notre coeur n'est point apaisé.

Quand je dis mauvaises pensées
Tu souris... - L'ombre est pleine d'yeux,
Vois, les fleurs semblent caressées
Par quelqu'un dans les bois joyeux. -

Viens ! l'heure passe. Aimons-nous vite !
Ton coeur, à qui l'amour fait peur,
Ne sait s'il cherche ou s'il évite
Ce démon dupe, ange trompeur.

En attendant, viens au bois sombre.
Soit. N'accorde aucune faveur.
Derrière toi, marchant dans l'ombre,
Le poëte sera rêveur ;

Et le faune, qui se dérobe,
Regardera du fond des eaux
Quand tu relèveras ta robe
Pour enjamber les clairs ruisseaux.



To Cruel Ocean

Where are the hapless shipmen?--disappeared,
Gone down, where witness none, save Night, hath been,
Ye deep, deep waves, of kneeling mothers feared,
What dismal tales know ye of things unseen?
Tales that ye tell your whispering selves between
The while in clouds to the flood-tide ye pour;
And this it is that gives you, as I ween,
Those mournful voices, mournful evermore,
When ye come in at eve to us who dwell on shore.


Serenade

When the voice of thy lute at the eve
Charmeth the ear,
In the hour of enchantment believe
What I murmur near.
That the tune can the Age of Gold
With its magic restore.
Play on, play on, my fair one,
Play on for evermore.

When thy laugh like the song of the dawn
Riseth so gay
That the shadows of Night are withdrawn
And melt away,
I remember my years of care
And misgiving no more.
Laugh on, laugh on, my fair one,
Laugh on for evermore.

When thy sleep like the moonlight above
Lulling the sea,
Doth enwind thee in visions of love,
Perchance, of me!
I can watch so in dream that enthralled me,
Never before!
Sleep on, sleep on, my fair one!
Sleep on for evermore.


Download Spiritnya, Share Juga Yuk..!!!
NEXT ARTICLE Next Post
PREVIOUS ARTICLE Previous Post
NEXT ARTICLE Next Post
PREVIOUS ARTICLE Previous Post
 

Delivered by FeedBurner